Woman Finds Chihuahua Alive Months After Presumed Euthanasia

This story brings up a lot of questions. What would you do if this happened to you?

– Kenn

Lisa Gossett’s one-year-old Chihuahua Lola was viciously attacked by another dog four months ago.

The veterinarian told her the outlook was grim and gave Gossett two choices.

“Pay out all this money and there’s a 20% chance that she’ll live or euthanize her, so it was hard,” said Gossett.

Gossett says she didn’t want Lola to suffer so she signed on the dotted line and said a painful goodbye.

It hit her 5-year-old daughter Bianca hard, she said.

“When she prays she says I want to see Lola again – I want to see Lola again,” said Gossett.

The family had moved on until this week, when Gossett got a phone call.

It was the company that programs the ID microchips that go into pets.

The caller said a woman was requesting to switch Lola’s chip over to a new owner.

“And I said ‘oh no, you’re mistaken Lola is not alive we had her put down she was in an accident’ and they said ‘no ma’am in fact she is alive and there’s a request for ownership for her,’” said Gossett.

Gossett immediately called the vet demanding answers.

It boils down to a document the owner signed when she gave the vet the go-ahead to euthanize the dog.

What she didn’t know, and what wasn’t explained to her, was she was surrendering all ownership rights to the veterinarian.

A worker at the vet’s office chose to turn Lola over to the foundation “Second Chance” which rehabilitates dogs.

They assigned Lola to a foster home for her recovery.

After finding out about the miscommunication, Second Chance put Gossett in touch with Lola’s new owner, Leslie Mason.

“When I was asked to take it I didn’t believe it had an owner and it was just in bad shape and needed to be nursed back to health,” said Mason.

Mason says she recently lost a dog to disease.

She says the only thing that got her through it was nursing Lola back to health – who she named Tinker.

“I want to say take her but then I want to say no, I want her – it’s just, it’s hard,” said Mason.

In an act of complete kindness, Gossett and her daughter decided to let Lola stay at her new home.

“I’m grateful that she’s in a place that she’s so happy, I’m grateful just to be able to see her again,” said Gossett.

Even though there was a happy ending, Gossett still has questions for the vet.

She says it was never explained to her that the vet could choose to keep the dog alive.

Clinic administrator Lynda Stevens says the worker who removed the dog violated policy and has been fired.

Comments

  1. Mr X1977 says

    I can’t believe they fired the worker who violated policy by saving that lil’ dogs life! No good deed goes unpunished…

  2. Cdnrn1 says

    If she wanted to give the dog a chance to survive and would have paid such a large bill, she would have not chosen euthansia, there is never a guarantee the animal will survive and be perfect,if money was not an issue she would have taken the chance and told the vet to save her dog if they could. The vet worker was wrong but also the lady made her choice knowingly. I don’t believe her shrug, “put it on the card..”It does not fit.

    • Darla says

      I cannot beleive she was not there for the euthansia I only do rescue dogs and have had to put 2 down and I held those guys until the very end, I wanted them in my arms so they could be calm and as comfortable as possible under the circumstances.

      • lars says

        Not everyone can watch their pet die Darla.  It’s not for you to judge a person who doesn’t stay in the room.  It’s not her fault.

    • ahhgoosh says

      that was my thought too.  I couldn’t just turn over my dog and say “ok, do whatever…”  I’m not saying she doesn’t deserve to have her dog back, but she actually did surrender it so I’m glad Lola was given a second chance.  That’s all that really matters as far as I’m concerned.

    • sera says

       How can you say that? The owner was not prepared to pay for surgery with the statistics given and chose to kill her dog instead. That’s it, she relinquished her ‘rights’. Another woman decided the dog was worth the risk and the expense and saved her and found her a new home and a second chance at life and you say you would want to stay until you are sure your pet is dead??? Just in case – god forbid – someone saves it??? People like you mistake love for possession. You would rather your dog be killed than belong to another person. That is sick. This little dog was extremely lucky and the his saviour – which should have been his owner – was punished. That is the disgrace!

  3. Westiechick2 says

    oh i know my lawyer would take care of this ,and lola would be lola in her lola home with me ,can you tell iam pis…

  4. Pilkate says

    The vet’s office had no right to charge her to euthanise her dog, pocket the money and send the dog on for rehabilitation with a foster home.  They took her money and ignored her request.  How would YOU feel if you found out your pet hadn’t been euthanised (for health reasons) and had been given to a research facility?  You might say, “That’s awful” or, “That could never happen” but, if the vet’s staff ignores a customer’s wishes, this COULD happen.. Who would know, if the animal wasn’t microchipped?

    You should be able to trust the “professionals.” 

    • sera says

      If a customer wants to stop fighting for his ‘pet’ and leaves it for dead at the clinic and someone at the veterinary clinic decides to fight to keep the little one alive KUDOS to them. If the customer couldn’t afford to pay the procedures he should be thankful that despite the fact he couldn’t provide for his pet – his responsibility as his carer – someone stepped in and gave the little one a chance at life. I am glad this could happen. What insane person would prefer their pet dead than alive with someone who could actually provide for it?? That is not love!! That is mine or no one else’s mentality!! We are speaking about a life here!!!!

  5. brandy says

    I generally would jump on this facility but I am hung up on the fact that LOLA WAS ATTACKED IN HER OWN HOME. Not to mention that she wasn’t really willing to give her dog a fighting chance. But regardless, how is she going to protect her dog while recovering from your other dog, when you couldn’t protect you dog in the first place. 

  6. Labrinth2010 says

    I always stand by my dogs when they pass. Holding them in my arms. I never ever am not there. They trust us and stay with us for better or worse so I feel bound to do the same. I know its hard to do but its harder to lose your life. So I do whats best for them. As for her choice to put her dog down…it was obviously the wrong choice! She gave up on her so its good that the employee saved that dogs life. I think once you sighn your dog away bc you don’t think they can make it or just cant afford it that you give up ownership of the dog. Since dogs are property still under the law, isnt it like throwing away trash? (I know that was harsh! and Im sorry) but dont you give up your rights to them as well? Besides she couldnt even be bothered with being there till the end so too bad for her.

  7. Lolo says

    wow this is a tough one. Firstly Lola was brought in injured and was told she was suffering and could not be helped is what I understand the owner was told. If the doctor had said that Lola could be helped and the owner said that she couldnt or didnt WANT to pay for that and then agreed to have her put to sleep then I really could understand why the care worker made a decision to save Lola herself. I am SURE the vets assistants heart was in the right place she was ONLY trying to save the littel dog and she did! I don’t at all believe the intent was to  be deceitful and profit from NOT euthanising Lola rather it is a case of the assistant wanting  to save the little dogs life. I do though think that because this happened that there should be a consent document signed By an owner if they choose to have their animal Put down because they don’t want to pay the expense whereby the vet can have the animal rescued by a group who will take on the financila burden for the dog.

  8. Sheila White says

    I am the same I stand by my dogs right to the very end. I I hold them and cuddle them as they have been a friend for all those years can’t leave them on their own when the time comes to have them put down.

  9. Nina says

    We just lost our little dog…he had to be put to sleep but my family was there with him, holding him and making him as comfortable as possible till he passed away!…How do you just leave him there and walk away??? My heart is still breaking…..

    • Catshawaii says

      That is so sad :( . Me and my sister take each other’s pets. I can’t take my own – it is just too hard. I hope you feel better soon.

  10. Catshawaii says

    I had a cat that showed up sick at a feral cat colony I manage. I took it to have it sent to the Youth In Asia and it pulled up a micro chip. The owner was shocked because she said the vet had put the cat down. Turns out the husband had taken the cat to be put down and I think he couldn’t do it – or couldn’t be bothered to do it – and released the cat because it turned out that his office was very close to the cat colony. All I know is the women was completely freaked out – and rightly so. Microchips are an amazing thing – I LOVE them !

  11. Baj says

    When one makes that heartbreaking decision to have an animal euthanized, one should stay with that animal until it’s over.  Leaving it in pain and fear for someone else to put down is cowardly, selfish, and inhumane. 

    Fortunately, somebody decided to give this little dog one last chance and she’s still here and happy in her new home.

  12. grammie says

    and request the ashes………….There was a book like this, about a baby that had Down’s Syndrome. I think it was “The Photographers Daughter”. Deception and the complications it creates are many, Difficult on emotional legal and many other levels?

  13. Karly's mom says

    Lola has a 2nd chance…that’s all that matters in this story.  Shame on her prior owner for not staying with her pet on its final journey.  They deserve nothing less.  I understand not being able to afford a vet bill…they can be astronomical and if the vet says only a 20% chance, tough choice.  Very glad Lola did not go back to that home, where she was originally hurt.  I hope Lola lives a long and happy life.  I also hope that the new owner will be there for her on her final journey as we all should be. The last thing our loving furry children should see is the person they love unconditionally.

  14. Tommygirl4255 says

    I don’t know, personally, I have already talked to my vet about “what if” situations. My dogs are my life, and I want what is best for them. If I am not there and something were to happen, or if I am not of “sound mind”, which is entirely possible in this type of situation (I would be hysterical), my vet and I have already discussed what I want done. I want everything possible done, so long as my dogs have a quality of life. If they are brought in, and there is no chance of survival, and they are in pain, I have given the go ahead to have them put down. If I am not there, I have asked for them to wait until I can get there, if they can keep my dog comfortable. I would never, never, never leave my dog alone to die. You will have to carry me out kicking and screaming. So while I feel for this woman, I don’t know how I feel about this outcome. Obviously for Lola/Tinker it was positive, but a dog is supposed to be your best friend, and they stand beside you through thick and thin…. so too should you. Thank God everyone in my life knows my wishes with regards to my dogs, and I have planned ahead. And thank God for pet insurance, so that cost is never a factor!!

  15. Tommygirl4255 says

    I don’t know, personally, I have already talked to my vet about “what if” situations. My dogs are my life, and I want what is best for them. If I am not there and something were to happen, or if I am not of “sound mind”, which is entirely possible in this type of situation (I would be hysterical), my vet and I have already discussed what I want done. I want everything possible done, so long as my dogs have a quality of life. If they are brought in, and there is no chance of survival, and they are in pain, I have given the go ahead to have them put down. If I am not there, I have asked for them to wait until I can get there, if they can keep my dog comfortable. I would never, never, never leave my dog alone to die. You will have to carry me out kicking and screaming. So while I feel for this woman, I don’t know how I feel about this outcome. Obviously for Lola/Tinker it was positive, but a dog is supposed to be your best friend, and they stand beside you through thick and thin…. so too should you. Thank God everyone in my life knows my wishes with regards to my dogs, and I have planned ahead. And thank God for pet insurance, so that cost is never a factor!!

  16. Bunnyslippers says

    No,no, no! The– now former— owner gave permission on false or misleading information from the VET. (as the information is presented here) That is not informed consent. The worker did a good deed, but he should have called the owner to let her know what was happening.

    The fact that they fired the worker is just the Vet covering for him/herself. This is just my humble opinion on the information stated in the story above.

    • sera says

      From the information given in this article – The vet gave the owner the two options  as he saw them, it was not misleading. Obviously the dog was lucky and struck the 20% chance of recovery. It states the woman “signed the dotted line” the fact she did not read the document she was signing with her signature does not make it uninformed consent. The dog survived surgery and has a new loving home, IT IS A GOOD STORY!! And how many kids who have their pet die get to see them again. The little girl gets to know her doggy is safe despite the pain of separation that is however not as bad as the separation of death.




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