From cesarmillaninc.com

Humans aren’t the only ones at risk for influenza; our canine companions can catch the bug as well. They have their own unique strain called H3N8. Thankfully, the number of dogs that die from the disease is very small — about 80% of dogs that contract the disease will only have a mild case — but severe cases can result in pneumonia and even death. Find out how to keep your dog safe and healthy!

Symptoms

The dog flu is a respiratory disease with symptoms similar to those of kennel cough: a nagging cough, fever, and nasal discharge. This disease is highly contagious, so if your dogexhibits symptoms, keep him away from other dogs while he is sick and for about two weeks after recovery.

Treatment

Your veterinarian can help you to determine the correct supportive care to help your dog mount an immune response. In milder forms, your vet may provide fluids to make sure your dog is well-hydrated and prescribe medicine to make your dog more comfortable. If a secondary bacterial infection occurs, antibiotics may be prescribed as well.

Prevention

An approved vaccine is available. Talk to your vet about your dog’s risk and other factors. Together, you can determine if this is the right option for your dog’s health.

Dog Flu and Humans

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no evidence that this virus infects humans. While it is possible that the virus can mutate, it is considered to pose a low threat to humans.

Treatment

Your veterinarian can help you to determine the correct supportive care to help your dog mount an immune response. In milder forms, your vet may provide fluids to make sure your dog is well-hydrated and prescribe medicine to make your dog more comfortable. If a secondary bacterial infection occurs, antibiotics may be prescribed as well.

If your dog exhibits symptoms, we recommend that you seek veterinary assistance as soon as possible.